Lesson 3

Work with Blending Modes

 

OBJECTIVE:
In this lesson, you will apply various blending modes to InDesign objects and note their effect

NOTE:  When Multiply is applied to an object, the object becomes transparent, but retains its color.  You can think of the effect as that of over-lapping lines drawn by magic markers.  There are 2 very important features of the Multiply blending mode that you must memorize:  when you apply the Multiply blending mode, any white areas of a graphic become transparent and any black areas remain black.

Sample Solution

Lesson:  Apply the Multiply blending mode

  1. Verify that the Selection tool is active, select the blue rectangle, click the Blending mode list arrow (on the Effects panel), then click Multiply—the rectangle becomes transparent and darkens the graphic it overlaps
  2. Select both the orange and blue circular objects, click the blending mode list arrow on the Effects panel, then click Multiply
  3. Click edit (on the Application bar), click Undo Set Transparency Parameters, click Edit (on the Application bar), then click Redo Set Transparency Parameters
  4. Repeat Step 3 so that you can compare the difference in the transparency when the objects are multiplied with the background graphic versus when they are transparent simply because of reduced opacity
    [TIP:  When you are done comparing, be sure that the two objects remain with the Multiply blending mode applied]
  5. Select the spoon, click on the Effects panel, then click Drop Shadow
  6. Note that the blending mode of the drop shadow is already specified as Multiply, then click Cancel—the drop shadow is transparent because its blending mode was specified as Multiply when created; this applies only to the drop shadow, not to the spoon graphic
  7. Click the Blending mode list arrow (on the Effects panel), then click Multiply—the spoon disappears because a white fill (Paper) becomes completely transparent when multiplied
  8. With the spoon still selected, click Wood (on the Swatches panel)
  9. Click the fork, then change the blending mode to Multiply—there is no visible change, because black multiplied with any other color remains black
  10. Change the fill color of the fork to Red, deselect the fork

Summary:  You applied the Multiply blending mode to various InDesign objects.

 

Lesson:  Experiment with various blending modes

  1. Select both the spoon and the fork, then change the blending mode to Screen—the colors change and the drop shadow disappears, because black always becomes transparent when the Screen blending mode is applied
    [TIP:  The Screen blending mode always lightens the overlapping areas of objects]
  2. Change the blending mode of the spoon and the fork to Overlay—in this case, the effect of the Overlay blending mode is similar to Screen, but it produces a richer color and the drop shadow reappears
  3. Change the blending mode to Hard Light
  4. Change the blending mode to Soft Light
    [TIP:  The Soft Light blending mode often produces an effect that is similar to but fainter than the Overlay mode]
  5. Change the blending mode to color—the resulting effect is the combination of the hue and saturation values of the spoon and the fork with the brightness values of the background object (the green-colored graphic)
  6. Change the blending mode to Darken—areas of the background object that are lighter than the foreground objects change to the color of the foreground objects—areas of the background object that are darker than the foreground objects do not change
  7. Make the Text layer visible (on the Layers panel), click the Selection tool, then click the Chefs on Safari text on the page
  8. Change the blending mode of the Chefs on Safari text to Overlay—the object becomes much darker because of the dark blue object behind the text
  9. Change the blending mode to hard Light, deselect

Summary:  You applied various blending modes to objects and noted their effects.