MVP Curriculum Philosophy

The Mathematics Vision Project
“The most necessary task of civilization is to teach people how to think. It
should be the primary purpose of our public schools . . . The trouble with our
way of educating is that it does not give elasticity to the mind. It casts the
brain into a mold. It insists that the child must accept. It does not encourage
original thought or reasoning, and it lays more stress on memory than
observation.” Thomas A. Edison
The Mathematics Vision Project (MVP) was created as a resource to teachers who desire to implement the Common Core
State Standards (CCSS) using a task-­‐based approach that leads to skill and efficiency in mathematics by first developing
understanding. The MVP approach is neither purely constructivist nor purely traditional. Rather, the approach takes
seriously the Standards of Mathematical Practice and develops these practices through experiential learning in mathematics. Students engage in mathematical problem solving, guided by skilled
teachers,
with
the
desired
outcome
that
students
will
achieve
mathematics
proficiency
as
defined
in
Adding
It
Up—conceptual
understanding,
procedural
fluency,
strategic
competence,
adaptive
reasoning,
and
productive
disposition.
(Adding
It
Up,
p.
5)
The
authors
have
taken
on
the
challenge
made
by
the
National
Research
Council
to
create
a
curriculum
where
students
do
not
learn
solely
by
either
“internalizing
what
a
teacher
or
book
says
or,
on
the
other
hand,
solely
by
inventing
mathematics
on
their
own”
(Adding
It
Up,
p.
11)
In
this
way,
all
the
strands
are
developed
in
a
balanced
way
and
students
achieve
proficiency.
The
Mathematics
Vision
Project
is
committed
to
helping
educators
implement
the
Common
Core
State
Standards
(CCSS)
as
part
of
a
continuum
of
mathematics
instruction
addressing
conceptual,
procedural,
and
representational
thinking;
depth
of
knowledge;
and
assessment.
The
CCSS
provide
a
coherent
trajectory
of
mathematical
content
that
students
should
be
learning
as
they
progress
from
kindergarten
to
12th
grade.
This
trajectory
was
developed
from
“research-­‐based
learning
progressions
detailing
what
is
known
today
about
how
students’
mathematical
knowledge,
skill,
and
understanding
develop
over
time.”(CCSS,
p.4)
The
Standards
are
not
just
a
checklist
of
sequential
content
that
should
be
taught
beginning
in
grade
school
and
brought
to
a
close
in
high
school.
In
order
to
bring
the
vision
of
the
Standards
to
life,
instructional
practice
must
change.
The
MVP
method
embraces
a
different
way
for
teachers
to
organize
instruction
to
deepen
student
learning
of
mathematics.
The
MVP
classroom
experience
begins
by
confronting
students
with
an
engaging
problem
and
then
allows
them
to
grapple
with
solving
it.
As
students’
ideas
emerge,
take
form,
and
are
shared,
the
teacher
orchestrates
the
student
discussions
and
explorations
towards
a
focused
mathematical
goal.
As
conjectures
are
made
and
explored,
teachers
use
formative
assessment
to
guide
students
as
they
embrace
effective
strategies
for
analyzing
and
solving
problems.
Students
justify
their
own
thinking
while
clarifying,
describing,
comparing,
and
questioning
the
thinking
of
others
leading
to
refined
thinking
and
mathematical
fluency.
What
begin
as
ideas
become
concepts
which
lead
to
formal,
traditional
mathematical
definitions
and
properties.
Strategies
become
algorithms
that
lead
to
procedures
supporting
efficiency
and
consistency.
Representations
become
tools
of
communication
which
are
formalized
as
mathematical
models.
This
is
how
students
learn
mathematics.
They
learn
by
doing
mathematics.
They
learn
by
verbalizing
the
way
they
see
the
mathematical
ideas
connect
and
by
listening
to
how
their
peers
perceived
the
problem.
This
process
describes
the
Continuum
of
Mathematical
Understanding
and
it
informs
how
teaching
should
be
conducted
within
the
classroom.
Each
module
in
the
MVP
educational
program
has
been
carefully
designed
and
sequenced
with
rich
mathematical
tasks
that
have
been
formulated
to
generate
and
develop
the
mathematical
concepts
within
the
core.
Careful
attention
has
been
placed
upon
the
way
mathematical
knowledge
emerges.
Some
tasks
are
developmental
tasks
while
others
are
for
solidifying
or
practicing
the
concepts.
The
tasks
also
encourage
students
to
notice
relationships
and
make
connections
between
the
concepts.
In
this
way,
students
perceive
mathematics
as
a
coherent
whole.
While
the
classroom
experience
begins
by
improving
students’
reasoning
and
sense-­‐making
skills,
it
does
not
conclude
until
mathematical
understanding
becomes
procedural
skill
as
evidenced
through
application.
Hence,
the
Ready,
Set,
Go!
homework
assignments
are
focused
on
students
practicing
procedural
skills
and
organizing
principles
to
add
structure
to
the
ideas
developed
during
the
classroom
experience.
As
in
any
discipline,
practice
is
the
refining
element
that
brings
fluency
and
agility
to
the
skills
of
the
participant.
Together
the
classroom
experience
and
the
Ready,
Set,
Go!
homework
assignments
present
a
balanced
combination
of
procedure
and
understanding
for
the
student
practitioner.
The
Mathematics
Vision
Project
has
produced
the
first
high
school
textbook
to
outline
the
steps
a
practicing
teacher
can
take
to
faithfully
implement
the
Integrated
Pathway
Secondary
Mathematics
1
core
standards.
The
modules
have
been
carefully
crafted
and
sequenced
to
allow
the
specific
mathematical
ideas
identified
in
the
core
to
surface
and
then
flourish
into
rich
mathematical
knowledge
and
skill
for
all
students.
The
textbook
for
Integrated
Pathway
Secondary
Mathematics
1
assumes
that
students
enrolled
in
the
course
have
been
properly
prepared.
The
Getting
Ready
module
may
be
used
in
the
classroom
to
review
content
that
should
have
been
mastered
in
previous
course
work
but
is
also
necessary
for
success
with
the
new
material.
The
Ready,
Set,
Go!
homework
assignments
have
been
designed
to
continue
to
spiral
a
review
of
content.
Combined,
the
classroom
experience
and
the
Ready,
Set,
Go!
homework
assignments
offer
a
powerful
blend
of
new
learning
and
maintained
proficiency.
For
more
information
about
the
Learning
Cycle
follow
the
link.
http://edutech.csun.edu/trd/sites/edutech.csun.edu.rtcweb/files/CMI%20Article.doc.
For
more
information
about
the
Mathematics
Vision
Project
visit.
www.mathematicsvisionproject.com